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state solution to keep up the pressure. on the issue of a potential vote that the united nations it is our view and the foreign secretary said this out yesterday in some detail, the palestinians should not take this to the un in the short term and we urged them not to do that. if they do so we will have to consider the right way to vote. in an end point is this. we will not solve this problem that the united nations. this problem will be solved by israelis and palestinians sitting at the negotiating table. there may be dangers from pushing the too early in terms of a cutoff of funds for the palestinian authority and other consequences that could follow so in the end bets get negotiations going rather than discussions at the u.n.. >> if the prime minister wants to send a clear message to scotland and england belong together shouldn't he be doing his best to make sure the principal road from london is not going to come back? >> my friend makes a very attractive bid for the statement and the chancellor is not here but i'm sure other treasury colleagues have been listening closely. >
of a potential vote that the united nations it is our view and the foreign secretary said this out yesterday in some detail, the palestinians should not take this to the un in the short term and we urged them not to do that. if they do so we will have to consider the right way to vote. in an end point is this. we will not solve this problem that the united nations. this problem will be solved by israelis and palestinians sitting at the negotiating table. there may be dangers from pushing the too early in terms of a cutoff of funds for the palestinian auority and oth consequences that could follow so in the end bets get negotiations going rather than discussions at the u.n.. >> if the prime minister wants to send a clear message to scotland and england belong together shouldn't he be doing his best to make sure the principal road from london is not going to come back? >> my friend makes a very attractive bid for the statement and the chancellor is not here but i'm sure other treasury colleagues have been listening closely. >> the prime minister claims universal credit will bring about the mos
. >> the united nations peacekeepers are completely useless. they stood there and watched the rebels take over without putting up any resistance. >> we feel absolutely cheated. >> the remaining u.n. forces meant to protect the civilian population of from reprisal. most other european personnel have already left. they're fleeing and the fighting in the thousands. many have gone east crossing the border into neighboring rwanda. the u.n. and because of the government say rwanda is supporting the rebels. the president is reportedly traveling to you ... for preventing tensions and all-out war. >> for more, we are joined by our correspondent in rwanda. what is the situation right there on the border? >> in it remains, because the fighting is over at least for the moment. it is quiet in the city. there was heavy fighting for three days. many slept under their beds for thre nights and explosions occurred just 50 meters away from some homes. they are looking poor to some quiet and peace. and the other side of the border, in rwanda, the refugees are coming in the thousands. the u.s. as the peacekeepers
was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest, dana? >> reporter: wolf, the three republican senators who had vowed to block susan rice from being secretary of state if the president nominates her had really softened the rhetoric in recent days. i'm told the reason for that was because it was a curtesy in order for them to wait until they had a face-to-face meeting with her which was today. after that meeting their criticism was harsher than ever. the way these grim-faced gop senators tell it, susan rice's attempt to calm their criticism backfired. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> i'm more disturbed now than i
, the timing is fortuitous. in the very week that palestinians applied to the united nations for recognition. a significant step towards the fulfillment of yasser arafat's life work. after arafat's death, experts warned after so many years definitive answers are likely to remain elusive. >> sreenivasan: swiss, french, and russian experts will examine the samples. palestinian officials said it will take at least three months to obtain any results. four women in the u.s. military filed suit in san francisco today, challenging the pentagon's ban on women in combat. they charged the ban violates the u.s. constitution and blocks women from key promotions. they also said that, in fact, women are already serving unofficially in combat units. this is the second such lawsuit filed this year against the military. greece dodged another financial bullet today, with a new infusion of bailout cash. european leaders and the international monetary fund agreed to release $57 billion in loans after 3 weeks of negotiations. the money will help greece stave off bankruptcy, recapitalize its banking industry, and
diplomatic issues. in 1971, the united nations in 1969. they were in the area and we have been re-integrating everything. for the first 75 years, we have never received the people's republic of china and the u.n. report -- they changed this position on the island. and to me, i don't want to get into that too many details. frankly, this is not the heart of the issue. china is trying to advance. there is an issue with japan. from japan to taiwan, the philippines, this is from the viewpoint of china. china has openly expressed their views on this in maritime security. and those are part of the reality. so this is a kind of comprehensive strategy to advance. >> that is an important point. what you're basically saying is that this is about power and the power -- china is clearly becoming more powerful. you are seeing lines being challenged. i remember talking to george soros once after he broke the back of england -- i'm sorry, broke the bank of england. what he saw as a hedge fund manager basically drove so hard against the wind that fundamentally the institutional power on the bank o
support. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job at the united nations and highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena and i will leave it at that. >> today's meeting place between ambassador rice and her staunchest critics on capitol hill. after his reelection president obama took exception to republican senators critical of rice saying if they want to come after anyone they should come after me. >> gretchen: we remember that. why is no one talking about susan rice, she went out on the talk shows and got the talking points from the white house and said what they wanted her to say. >> brian: she said the intelligence. >> gretchen: that's why she would be secretary of state. she did what she was asked to do and did it well and it worked with the electorate you could argue and now she will be secretary of state. what is going to stop it? >> steve: not necessarily. senate aides. administration is having her sell herself up on capitol hill today and what she is doing, she is appealing to the moderates, in particular republicans from georgia and tennessee. th
it into law. yellowstone officially became the first national park of the united states of america. the significance of preserving this vast and remote tract of land was profound. the nation, not yet a century old, was still seeking its own cultural and national identity. the natural wonders and unspoiled grandeur of the american landscape were now promoted as the country's unique heritage. the new york herald wrot "their beauty, their splendor, their extraordinary and sometimes terrible manifestations of nature form a series of attractions possessed by no other nation." three months later, moran's "the grand canyon of the yellowstone" was bought by the federal government for $10,000. the painting was hung in the u.s. capitol, a triumph for moran. soon after, he began signing his work with the monogram "t.y.m." for thomas "yellowsto" moran. yellowstone remained a source of inspiration throughout moran's career. in 1892, the artist returned to the park to create new paintings of its wonders. by this time, yellowstone was a popular tourist attraction. the idea of the national park, s
after the united nations issued a report in 1969. there is a potential [indiscernible] we integrated the islands in 1895, about 220 years ago. for the first 75 years, we never received any claim from china. the un report changed their position and they started to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details. but i would like to point to the two elements. this is not an isolated issue. in the south china sea, china is trying to advance into the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claimed the islands in the south china sea. in the east china sea, there is an issue with japan. in the japanese archipelago to taiwan, the philippines, [indiscernible] china ultimately expressed a strong interest in the maritime security and the territorial claim among those islands. this is a chinese maritime strategy. >> that is an important point. what you're basically saying is this is about power. china is clearly becoming more powerful. you are seeing lines challenged. i remember talking to george soros after he so-called broke the back -- broke the bank of england and he
and expansion of the territory of the nation went hand-in-hand. in fact, although the united states won no change in the british policy as a result of the war, the country did gain undisputed control of western land that had once been claimed by indians. these were lands that were previously settled by whites and cultivated insubstantial parts by men and women. now what this means is that all members of the nation's populace, no matter their civic status, no matter whether they could vote for against the president, could assist in the process of settling and thereby securing the nation's land. with no casual choice of words then when madison did not call on all the nations as citizens to support their country. instead, he called far more broadly to quote all the good people of the united states, as they love their country to exert themselves. those loving people included the nation's entire population, male or female, slaves are free, excluding only the indian inhabitants of the continent who continued to struggle for their own sovereignty. now what i would like to do in a time that we
morning. a day of negotiations and talks with the secretary of state clinton. the united nations secretary-general and the egyptian president. there is still no cease-fire announced thus far. but while they're carrying out their talks, the violence on both side of the border have intensified as well. gaza came under heavy fire overnight from the air and warships in the sea, pummeling hamas' command and control center, the rocket launcher by the ied. the defense forces say they have destroyed 50 underground rockets in sight. the ied says the rockets were fired from gaza to the populated areas in israel. fortunately they were intercepted by the iron dome. so it's a very precarious situation. >> you are right, lama, a strange 24 hours. early word yesterday that a cease-fire was in the making. as you said, the bombings continued here. so where do things stand now in terms of any chance for a cease-fire? >> well, the secretary of state meeting, the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu quite late last night. the message is that the escalation of the violence here. and to support a long-term
, that left four americans dead. speaking at the united nations wednesday, rice said she was working off the best information she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >> rice considered a top candidate to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state has been criticized by top republicans for initially saying the attacks in benghazi were not terror attacks. >>> more than 18,000 people will soon be out of a job. now that a judge approved the liquidation wednesday of iconic hostess brands. the company will be shutting down operations immediately after failing to reach a deal with a striking bakers union. but don't say good-bye to the twinkie just yet. hostess says it's optimistic buyers will swoop in to produce some of the most popular products. >>> and if you were one of the millions of people who hit the road or rails this thanksgiving, let's hope you were not stuck in this mess. thousands of cars were ba
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
. is the author of more than a dozen books, including first a pitcher's history of the united states, which he co-authored. other topics on which is written include national defense, history and historiography in the u.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we
, with the wrong skin color? the beauty of our constitution is that it gives everyone in the united states basic due process rights to a trial by a jury of their peers. that is what makes this nation great. as justice sandra day o'connor wrote for the plurality in hamdi v. rumsfeld, and i vote -- "as critical as the government's interest may be in detaining those who actually pose an immediate threat to the national security of the united states during ongoing international conflict, history and common sense teach us that an unchecked system of detention carries the potential to become a means for oppression and abuse of others who do not present that sort of threat." i mean, just think of it. if you were of the wrong race and you were in a place where there was an attack, you were picked up, you could be held without charge or trial month after month, year after year, that's wrong. experiences over the last decade prove the country is safer now than before the 9/11 attacks. terrorists are behind bars. dangerous plots have been thwarted. the system is working, and hopefully improving each day. s
in the bilateral relationship between the united states and pakistan, one area in which our national interests continue to align, continue to align, is defeating the terrorists on pakistan's soil that threaten both of us. we remain committed to pursuing defense cooperation based on these shared interests. thirdly, we must prevent the emergence of new safe havens for al qaeda elsewhere in the world that could be used to attack the united states or our interests. the last decade of war has shown that coordinated efforts to share intelligence, to conduct operations with partners, are critical to making sure that al qaeda has no place to hide. we will expand these efforts, including, through support and partnership with governments in transition in the middle east and north africa. this campaign against al qaeda will largely take place outside declared combat zones. using a small footprint approach that includes precision partnered activities with foreign special forces operations and capacity building so that partner countries can be more effective in combating terrorism on their own. wherever po
there was this notion that france and england would be a united union. they weren't calling it a country, but a national union. it would have two parliaments but one war cabinet, and every citizen of france would be a citizen of britain. churchill was a little skeptical at first, but then he went to the cabinet, and he said we can't be accused here of not having imagination, so let's, let's propose this. and it actually was, it was presented to the french cabinet but not all that seriously. by the time it came up, it was really too late. so france conducted a armistice with the germans and came to what we know as the agreement that sets up the government in the southern part of the country. the germans occupied the northern part, the northern two-thirds of the country along with all of the atlantic coast. and -- >> host: and, essentially, left in place the lower third, correct? >> guest: they wanted a government to govern that part of the country and also the colonies in north africa and southeast asia. they didn't want to be distracted by that. so part of the agreement was you set up this government --
, the campaign to fix the national debt. and a petition filed by residents to secede from the united states. washington journal, with your phone calls, tweets, and e- mail's. >> we can remember barack obama's speech in 2004, the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure and four years later, the most honorable candidate for the presidency. lincoln is a dazzling speech in new york, it is a beautiful testament to the quality of his mind, the research he does, the logical argument. when he runs for the set that, barack obama gave the speech in 2004 running for the senate in illinois. abraham lincoln ran for the senate in illinois and he lost. if you want to think about abraham lincoln in 1860, think about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weeken
to fix the national debt. then in the depositions to secede from the united states. we are joined by a georgetown university law professor. washington journal, live starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slav
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economis
? >>heather: and a possible huge change in united states defense policy amid turnover in personal. owe new faces could impact our national security. d states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit care.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>gregg: time now for the top of the news. egypt's stock market taking a tumble after president morsi's taking a power grab possibly sending egypt's troubled economy into trouble. >>heather: and $27 billion needed to clean up after hurricane sandy and will go to hiring more than 5,000 unemployed people in new york. >>gregg: strong
solution to the problem. so i think with so many he could have united the people of good will to address this problem and that polarized the nation and was the beginning of polarization that would never end until a civil war. >> if we could bring john quincy adams to the day, what do you think he would like and not like america in 2012? >> he would despise our involvement overseas. our attempt to dictate to society's the kind of society as they have to have. when he had the opportunity as the secretary of state to intervene, monroe would have done whatever he could in the pro-democracy movement so to speak he pointed out that these people have no history of self-government. religiously or politically they had never been exposed to self-government. their political culture and family culture did not tolerate. he said this is a lost cause we must not involve ourselves and said he would not involve us in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, no political history or religious history of self governance. they don't know what it means.
the slave property into the territories owned by the entire nation. in 1857 in the infamous dr. scott decision, the united states supreme court affirmed the southern constitutional chief. republicans in contrast said never if. fifth republicans would allow in any territory. abraham lincoln was elected in november of 1860. a month later in the united states congress can intercession. members of congress put forth various compromise proposals. a critical portion of all dealt with the division of territory. most often there was a proposal to extend a dividing line west of the beyond louisiana purchase all the way to the border of california. now, after this process i'm going to get to my main topic why lincoln rejected the compromise which meant the territories. but their must be one thing more. i am going to talk about three different men tonight. one of you, one of them, all of you know his name, abraham lincoln when he was and what he did. the others are not so well known. you will be familiar with henry clay a great kentucky state's mind 1860 from new york state and prior to ligon's
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
so weaken the nation, that it would be very, very prone to of foreign involvement, the british were still in canada, obviously. there were certainly foreign threats that are weakened and divided united states would have been prone to. on to the second question, which is about social media and lincoln. first of all, there was plenty of social media in 1861-1865 because it was the era in which mass communications was available. the telegraph, the railroad, the newspaper or all becoming much more prevalent. many more americans were littered and reading newspapers, so people were seeing and hearing about the carnage of the war every single day. the telegraph offices would be filled with the casualty report. the other thing that changed very, very radically was that this was also the first american war that was photographed, and people were seeing photographs of the carnage. the new york times in a very, very famous review of mathew brady studio putting up a display of war scenes said that the photograph had brought the war into living rooms. so i think that certainly wasn't as prevalent
. the pledge allegiance says one nation under god, indivisible, so that the country is indivisible. that is the hope for the country, as a unit. >> we want to remind our viewers we have a special line for people who have signed a petition to secede from the united states. our next call comes from michael and florida. he welcome to the program. are you there? >> i agree with paul. i think we should cut washington and send them adrift. >> what made you want to sign the petition? do really think that could happen? >> i think it can and i think it would be a good thing. we would not be tied up in all of the bureaucratic nonsense. >> would you see florida as becoming its own country? or maybe grouping with other states? >> the latter. host: we had a war over that. caller: we won. host: which way would that be? mike, you still there? we had a war over that and did not turn out too well for the guys trying to secede. be ok thishink it'll time. professor? guest: it is interesting that the states got to get there, and the mind -- may not be contiguous. it might be florida and texas would fo
. -- posttraumatic stress disorder. they want to get involved. they contribute to our nation and communities. what they need more than anything else is a connection. they need an on ramp into society when they return. college, unit, our company. that is what we can do. we cannot do it alone. the va is facing serious challenges. have -- there are almost a million disability claims backlog. folks are waiting to find out if they will get care, if they would get payment, what is next. that can be a burden. these are all solvable problems. the challenge is isolated to the veterans community. these conversations are branching out. you do not have to be a veteran to support the movement. it does not matter who you voted for or how you feel about the war. we can be united and reassured that we do not repeat the mistakes of vietnam. last week there was a high- profile debate on domestic policy. the two presidential candidates that together as americans watched. there was a were you did not hear in that debate -- veteran. veterans was not considered a domestic policy priority. that has to change. in order f
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)